All posts filed under: Bayeux

How I use my iPad pro for illustration purposes.

I have an iPad Pro and I use it in a number of ways for my art, designs and the planning of my Designs.
I’m going to show you how I used it for some of the illustrations for my Bayeux Project.
I photocopied the image I wanted to reproduce.
This is a screen shot of the process.
I use Adobe sketch, an iPad and an iPhone application.
On opening the application you will find two small squares on the left hand side. One has sketch layer written on it, the other has background.

The Bayeux Discipline – my passion.

My discipline is that I’ve set myself the task to work for 10 hours a day on my Bayeux Project for seven days a week. Physically it’s demanding. Emotionally it’s exciting and to be really honest this quilt is completely different to the sample piece. Its 236 feet of sheer delight for me. Like many of you, I’m having a problem seeing the fine details so I have an appointment at the optician tomorrow.

Edward the Confessor

Edward the Confessor, King of England Written on 27 March 2013 by Archivist in Nobility Edward the Confessor Susan Abernethy joins the Medieval Archives with another great post. Susan is the Freelance History Writer, covering topics from Ancient history to the 20th Century. Visit her blog at thefreelancehistorywriter.com. You can also like Susan on Facebook or follow Susan on Twitter. ~The Archivist Edward the Confessor was the last Anglo-Saxon king who could trace his ancestry back to King Alfred the Great and King Cerdic of Wessex. He was the great-great-great-great grandson of Alfred and he died childless, leaving England open to conquest from overseas. Edward’s father was Aethelred the Unready, the hapless king who was besieged by the Vikings on all coasts. In 1002, he was widowed and contracted a marriage with Emma, the sister of Richard, Duke of Normandy. Edward was born at Islip in Oxfordshire within the first two years of his parents wedding. Edward’s mother was a formidable woman but his father was not someone he could look up to and he …

New books,

There are times when I’m unable to work on my major Project, “The Bayeux Tapestry to Quilt” (to be honest, lots of time)But I have a lot of extra curricular work with this project so I can take work with me on the road.I have reference books on my Ipad and I’ve just taken delivery of 3 new books.The Handfasted Wife, The story of Edith Swanneck  beloved with of Harold Godwinson – by Carol McGrath.  The man behind the Bayeux Tapestry. Odo William the Conquerors Half-brother by Trevor Rowley.The Bayeux Tapestry, New Approaches. Proceedings of a conference at the British Museum.  The three books are very different, one is a novel and the other two are reference books. I write in my books, I make notes and then add the notes to the computer. It annoys my husband… he doesn’t cope with the scribbles in new books. I’ve really only had time to look at the New Approaches book and I find it fascinating. “The Tapestry seems to have been commissioned by someone who wanted …

March 31st, 2013

Edward the Confessor, King of England Written on 27 March 2013 by Archivist in Nobility Edward the Confessor Susan Abernethy joins the Medieval Archives with another great post. Susan is the Freelance History Writer, covering topics from Ancient history to the 20th Century. Visit her blog at thefreelancehistorywriter.com. You can also like Susan on Facebook or follow Susan on Twitter. ~The Archivist Edward the Confessor was the last Anglo-Saxon king who could trace his ancestry back to King Alfred the Great and King Cerdic of Wessex. He was the great-great-great-great grandson of Alfred and he died childless, leaving England open to conquest from overseas. Edward’s father was Aethelred the Unready, the hapless king who was besieged by the Vikings on all coasts. In 1002, he was widowed and contracted a marriage with Emma, the sister of Richard, Duke of Normandy. Edward was born at Islip in Oxfordshire within the first two years of his parents wedding. Edward’s mother was a formidable woman but his father was not someone he could look up to and he …

February 15th, 2013

My friend Carolyn sent this to me this morning, Its fun to do. “This one is a bit of fun and is called the Historic Tale Construction kit.  You can make up your own story using all the images from the tapestry.  It has a page of animals, people, warriors,buildings and other things that you can put onto the linen to make up your own version.  Might be interesting to trial other little quilts?” This is like a computer game… I did it this morning.

 The Alderney Tapestry A True Community Project

From the outset the aim was to create a Finale that would look as though it could have been the original ending.  The Alderney Tapestry is stitched on the same type of linen as the original and with the same sort of wools in the same colours and follows the same style as the original with the history of the times depicted in the central panel and with upper and lower borders which sometimes show mythical animals similar to those found in the Bayeux Tapestry and sometimes show images which augment or comment on the images in the central panel. HRH The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall putting their stitch in helped by Kate Russell and Moira Sleeman There are, however, two Channel Island references, one of which is an anachronism that would definitely indicate that this could never have been the original work.  One of these is the inclusion in the upper border of Wace, the author of the Roman de Rou which tells the history of the Normans from the …

The Hands

These are some of  the hands I drew ready for applique yesterday.The hands are larger According to the status of the image. For instance the largest hand depicted in this illustration is the hand of King Edward as he received a contrite Harold who has just returned from France. Harold approaches his sovereign in an attitude of self abasement its unknown whether out of shame over what happened in Normandy or out of merely conventional deference is far from clear.  (LM) The depiction of Harold with hunched stance and open hands is very dramatic and leaves the viewer  under the impression he is of lower standing.