Blog, photographic journal, Photography, Street photography
Comments 4

Things I saw in Santa Fe and Carrizozo NM

We arrived in Santa Fe New Mexico late afternoon yesterday afternoon.

We have a 4 year old and an 8 month old in tow and so we are looking at things just a little differently. However, these are a few of my favorite things to look at when I visit this amazing place.

DSC01472

One of my favorite galleries has these statues in the window. I’m not sure of the name of the gallery, but I will source it again today.

DSC01471

DSC01470

Reminding me of our visit to white sands the other day. I love the simplicity of this image.

DSC01469

Just plain stunning.

DSC01468

DSC01467

Built in 1931, The Lensic is more than a theater to the people of Santa Fe. For most of the 20th century, The Lensic was a place for a first kiss in the balcony, a grand silver screen in the midst of the Depression, a vaudeville venue where the community could see the singers, actors, dancers, and comedians of the day. It was a place where magic happened. By the late 1990s, however, the theater had fallen into disrepair. Despite one-of-a-kind architecture and seating for more than 800 people, The Lensic was in danger of becoming an empty house when in 1999 a vision for a world-class performing arts center was born. It was time for a new chapter in the venerated theater’s life.

DSC01482

This was supper at the Los Magueyes Mexican Restaurant in Burro Lane. The food was good and plentiful, the music great, the margaritas a little week and the restrooms are lined with mirrors. A little shock for the unwary I must say.

DSC01473DSC01480_HDR

The following images were taken in Carrizozo New Mexico on our way to Santa Fe.

Carrizozo is a town in  New Mexico  with a population of 996. Founded in 1899, the town provided the main railroad access for Lincoln County, and the town experienced significant population growth in the early decades of the 1900s. However, with declining relevance of the railroad, the population of the town has gradually declined. It’s know now for its statues of burros, some even hiding on rooftops.

DSC01455DSC01454DSC01453DSC01452DSC01451DSC01446_HDRDSC01436DSC01434DSC01444DSC01442DSC01443DSC01447_HDRDSC01445DSC01450

4 Comments

  1. Teresa Hartman says

    You take the most amazing photographs. I love them, as well as your marvelous quilts.

    Like

  2. Linda Bennett says

    Hi Pam, I love following your travels and quilting. I even got to take a class from you in Durango CO.

    Somewhere I saw that your writing a book about the Bayeux Trapestry. Is it in print? I can’t wait to see it and I’m interested in your techniques. Are your techniques basically the same as in your book “The 1776 Quilt?” Are you satin stitching each piece?

    If you don’t have time to respond I understand. Happy dat to you in Santa Fe, Linda

    On Wed, Jun 28, 2017 at 9:30 AM I am Pam Holland wrote:

    > Pam Holland posted: “We arrived in Santa Fe New Mexico late afternoon > yesterday afternoon. We have a 4 year old and an 8 month old in tow and so > we are looking at things just a little differently. However, these are a > few of my favorite things to look at when I visit this am” >

    Like

    • Yes I am writing a book as I work on the project. It’s similar to the 1776, quilt but the quilting is much more intense, the 1776 quilts was one of my first.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s